Should you be driving?

Aussie drink-driving laws have similar penalties, but our BAC level is still at .05. This will be moved to .02 in the coming years.
Be safe for you, your family and the person you may injure because, you thought you were ‘ok to drive!’

SHOULD YOU BE DRIVING? DON'T DRINK AND DRIVE....EVER!

TEST YOURSELF NOW

Did you get your copy of the
FenceBuilder Newsletter?

You can view the newsletter here.

View the eNews Update Special - RBT Celebration

View all Past Issues here

Does the social context of early alcohol use affect risky drinking in adolescents? Prospective cohort study


Louisa Degenhardt 1234*, Helena Romaniuk 256, Carolyn Coffey 2, Wayne D. Hall 78, Wendy Swift 1, John B. Carlin 35, Christina O’Loughlin 2 and George C. Patton 26


* Corresponding author: Louisa Degenhardt This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Abstract

Background

There are limited longitudinal data on the associations between different social contexts of alcohol use and risky adolescent drinking.
 
Methods

Australian prospective longitudinal cohort of 1943 adolescents with 6 assessment waves at ages 14–17 years. Drinkers were asked where and how frequently they drank. Contexts were: at home with family, at home alone, at a party with friends, in a park/car, or at a bar/nightclub. The outcomes were prevalence and incidence of risky drinking (≥5 standard drinks (10g alcohol) on a day, past week) and very risky drinking (>20 standard drinks for males and >11 for females) in early (waves 1–2) and late (waves 3–6) adolescence.
 
Results

Forty-four percent (95 % CI: 41-46 %) reported past-week risky drinking on at least one wave during adolescence (waves 1–6). Drinking at a party was the most common repeated drinking context in early adolescence (28 %, 95 % CI 26-30 %); 15 % reported drinking repeatedly (3+ times) with their family in early adolescence (95 % CI: 14-17 %). For all contexts (including drinking with family), drinking 3+ times in a given context was associated with increased the risk of risky drinking in later adolescence. These effects remained apparent after adjustment for potential confounders (e.g. for drinking with family, adjusted RR 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.5-2.4). Similar patterns were observed for very risky drinking.
 
Conclusions

Our results suggest that consumption with family does not protect against risky drinking. Furthermore, parents who wish to minimise high risk drinking by their adolescent children might also limit their children’s opportunities to consume alcohol in unsupervised settings.
 
Read more